What Are the JFK Assassination Conspiracy Theories? Historians on Popular Culture (2012)

The circumstances surrounding the assassination of John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, spawned suspicions of a conspiracy. These suspicions were mitigated somewhat when an official investigation by the Warren Commission concluded the following year that there was no conspiracy. Since then, doubts have arisen regarding the Commission’s controversial finding that only Lee Harvey Oswald was responsible for the assassination of Kennedy, and many Americans believe that others besides Oswald were also involved in the assassination.[1] Critics have argued that the Commission and the government have covered up crucial information pointing to a conspiracy.

Subsequent official investigations confirmed most of the conclusions of the Warren Commission. However, the United States House Select Committee on Assassinations (HSCA) concluded in 1979 that Kennedy was probably assassinated as the result of a conspiracy, with: “…a high probability that two gunmen fired at [the] President”. No person or organization was identified by the HSCA as having been a co-conspirator of Oswald.[2][3] The acoustical evidence that the HSCA partly based its conspiracy conclusion on has since been discredited.[4][5][6][7][8][9]

Most current theories put forth a criminal conspiracy involving parties as varied as the CIA, the Mafia, anti-Castro Cuban exile groups, the military industrial complex, the Israeli Mossad, sitting Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, Cuban President Fidel Castro, FBI director J. Edgar Hoover, the KGB, or some combination of those entities.[10] In an article published prior to the 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s assassination, author Vincent Bugliosi estimates that a total of 42 groups, 82 assassins, and 214 people have been accused in conspiracy theories challenging the “lone gunman” theory.

JFK, a 1991 film that examines the events leading to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and alleged subsequent cover-up, through the eyes of former New Orleans district attorney Jim Garrison.
American Tabloid, a 1995 novel by James Ellroy, which portrays the five years leading up to the assassination from the point of view of a group of Mafia associates and CIA operatives, who become embroiled in the Bay of Pigs Invasion and eventually help plan the crime.
An American Affair, a 2009 film that portrays the assassination and the relation between Kennedy and Mary Pinchot Meyer.
The Cold Six Thousand, a 2001 novel by James Ellroy, the sequel to American Tabloid. The first third of the novel portrays a cover-up of the JFK assassination, while the remainder concerns the events leading up to the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy.
Executive Action, a 1973 film by David Miller that portrays the assassination from the point of view of the conspirators, who are right-wing tycoons and former covert ops specialists.
JFK: 3 Shots That Changed America, a 2009 documentary film compiled from archived news.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_F._Kennedy_assassination_conspiracy_theories

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