Tag Archives: Project Blue Book

Flying Saucers (UFOs) Sighters Get scientific Support | UFO CHRONICLE – 8-12-1965

Flying Saucers Get scientific Support - Chicago Sun-Times 8-12-1965

     […]

Jacqques Vallee, French-born astronomer now a Chicagoan, believes a lack of authentic research may be at the bottom of inability to place UFOs in perspective.

[…]

“The current increase in the number of UFO reports,” he said, “undoubtedly marks the beginning of a wave comparable to those of 1954 or 1957. Currently there is a deluge of reports all over Europe, Australia and South America.
8:46 AM 11/28/2017

By Chicago Sun-Times
8-12-1965

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The UFO Phenomenon and Close Encounters of the Third Kind – 40th Anniversary

Close Encounters Poster

A cinematic marvel that inspired directors of the sci-fi genre, this month marks forty years since the release of Steven Spielberg’s Close Encounters of the Third Kind. It was also an integral component of the American UFO and abduction phenomenon in the late 20th century, which significantly increased public awareness and interest in extraterrestrial existence.

     Sightings of unidentified flying objects can be traced as far back as 500 B.C., but the culture surrounding UFOs and alien abductions we know today began in the early 1940s. In between the 40s and the 1977 release of Close Encounters, major events such as the Roswell Incident of ’47 and mysterious government projects (Project Sign, Project Grudge, and Project Blue Book) occurred.
By Sophie McEvoy
The National Student
11-16-17

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UFO Investigative Teams and Brigadier General Arthur Exon

Brigadier General Arthur Exon

     As happens all too often, as I’m searching for something else, I stumble onto a document that helps explain information I had found in the past. Brigadier General Arthur Exon, who was the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base commander, a position similar to that of a mayor, told me during an interview on May 19, 1990, that he was responsible for dispatching aircraft to carry investigators to important UFO sightings. He said:

Well, the way this happened to me is that I would get a call and say that the crew or the team was leaving and


By Kevin Randle
A Different Perspective
8-15-17

they knew… there was such and such a time they wanted an airplane and pilots to take “X” number of people to wherever, you know. They might be gone two or three days or might be gone a week. The would come back and that would be the end of it. So, there would be certain people in FTD [ATIC evolved into FTD in 1961] that would lay the missions on… I know they went out to Montana and Wyoming and the northwest states a number of times in a year and a half… They went to Arizona once or twice.

These special teams, or these people, would apparently come from around the United States and their assignment was to investigate a UFO sighting according to Exon. He didn’t have much in the way of details about these special flights, but the implication I took away from this was that the teams, or the team members, were a specially trained group who were investigating UFOs at a higher level than Project Blue Book. It was clear that they weren’t part of the Blue Book operation.

We (Don Schmitt and I, who first interviewed Exon) asked if the men were assigned to Wright-Patterson. Exon said, “No. They would come from Washington, D.C.” He also said that the team would be made up of eight, maybe fifteen people, the number probably dictated by the sighting they were investigating. The idea was that if anyone checked, they would learn that the team had been dispatched from Wright-Patterson as a way of disguising the nature of this somewhat secret activity.

During my interview with Exon, I wanted to know if he knew who the controlling agency or agencies were. I thought FTD was one of those agencies, but Exon said, “I don’t know they were controlling but I know where the assignments came from.”

I asked, “That was basically your control? FTD?”

He said, simply, “Yeah.”

The conclusions that I drew, and the conclusions that Don drew, were that teams, controlled at a different level, but that were not assigned to Blue Book were called in for special investigations. This, according to Exon, was in 1960 and 1961.

But it turns out, according to the documentation that I have just found, this assumption is not true. Oh, the documents were there in the Project Blue Book files for anyone to find who scanned through the boxes and boxes of data as it is contained on microfilm. As, I say, I was looking for something else when I found this.

According to the documents, in a draft of a staff study that was declassified in 1969 but suggested in a document dated December 17, 1958, that:

To provide a flexible investigative force which will not cause a particular drain on any one office within ATIC [think FTD at this point] the Commander has approved the establishment of a volunteer force which will work under the direction of the Aerial Phenomena Group of the Air Science Division when actually engaged in field investigation of UFO sightings. The general ground rules for their employment are as follows:

A total group of from 18 to 20 volunteers will be selected from company grade officers [lieutenants and captains] and NCO’s presently assigned within ATIC. This group will for the most part be people who do not have much opportunity to travel during the normal course of their duties. Once selected they will be given a 20 hour course of instruction in interrogative and investigative procedures and will be checked out on equipment pertinent thereto [the class syllabus was included in the documentation]. Once trained two of these individuals will be placed on alert each week to undertake such investigations as may arise during the week. Orders required for TDY [temporary duty] travel will be processed by the Aerial Phenomena Group citing funds programmed by that Group for such travel. A separate project nick-named “Horse Fly” [which is the first time that I have heard of this project] will be established to provide military airlift for investigators to and from the nearest Air Force installation to point of UFO sighting. Flyaway kits of equipment will be issued by and specific flight arrangements will be made by the Aerial Phenomena Group.

It is estimated that each investigator can plan on about 5 TDY trips of 3 days duration per year.

The officer who signed the document was William E. Boyd, who was a colonel at the time and listed as the Chief of Staff at ATIC. Although what I found was a draft, there was additional discussion about this later but it apparently was implemented. While the suggestion is that the alert teams would be made up of two individuals, there was nothing in the original document to suggest that the deployment teams were restricted to the two people on alert. This sounds suspiciously like the teams that Exon spoke about when he talked to me, though he seemed to have overestimated the size. They didn’t come from Washington, D.C as he suggested, but they were not all consolidated in a single office within ATIC. They would come from a number of locations within ATIC to deploy into the field.

Given that the documents were originally classified (confidential, I believe), and given the nature of the assignment, I don’t believe that there was any reason for Exon to have denied the request for the assets needed. It would have come from inside ATIC [or later FTD], or possibly from the Pentagon, authorizing the use of military equipment to move the personnel into the field. Since it involved specific intelligence, which in this case would be a UFO sighting or landing, there would be no reason to brief Exon on the specific mission. The request would have the proper authorization, and in fact, given the nature of it, and the various authorizations approved, there would be no reason for Exon to handle this personally. Someone on his staff could certainly have made the arrangements and if there were questions about the authorizations, those might have been bumped up to Exon for resolution, but I doubt that would be necessary. This suggests the reason that Exon was rather vague on the nature of the assignments. He wouldn’t be doing the work himself, one of his staff did, and Exon was probably briefed on this, as he would be on other aspects of the operations at Wright-Patterson that fell under his area of authority. At the time, this would not have been a big deal, but the routine movement of assets to a location where their expertise would be of value.

This means, I suppose, that we shouldn’t draw any specific conclusions about the nature of these teams, simply because we now know about their formation, their purpose, and their deployments. They were sent to investigate UFO sightings that would require the expertise that these officers and NCOs brought to the table based on their 20 hours of classroom work so that they knew, at least in a rudimentary sense, what they were doing.

What I don’t know at this point is where their reports would have been sent. Probably to the Aerial Phenomena Group, which would have been housed at ATIC and then FTD when the name change came about. All I really know is that the teams were formed and were apparently deployed on a number of investigations. While all this is interesting, it seems to lessen the importance of the information supplied by Exon, but it does give another avenue of investigation. It will be interesting to see if I can find the results of those investigations that Exon mentioned.

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UFO / ET Contact at CIA Head Quarters in Washington D.C.?

UFO / ET Contact at CIA Head Quarters in Washington D.C.?

     [The] so-called “Psychic Incident” which took place at a CIA building in downtown Washington, D.C. … [It] reportedly occurred on July 6, 1959. And according to a report filed by Major Friend, USAF,
By Just Cause
Sept 1978

Commanding Officer of Project Blue Book, contact was made, a UFO appeared upon request and was viewed through the window by CIA personnel, and the sighting was later confirmed by radar.

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Close Encounters: Why UFOs Are Having a Moment

Close Encounters: Why UFOs Are Having a Moment

A new biography on scientist Dr. J. Allen Hynek shows that we might be on the verge of another cluster of UFO sighting reports

     When the unassuming turn of phrase “unidentified flying object” was coined in the 1940s, it was intended to suggest that the objects in question were nothing more mysterious than a rogue weather balloon or an unfamiliar aircraft. UFOs have since become synonymous
By Annaliese Griffin
Rolling Stone
7-6-17

with aliens, from cartoon flying saucers, to abduction stories, to X-Files-style conspiracy theories – in the popular imagination their mystery has been solved, UFOs equal aliens, whether you’re a true believer or not. This unshakable association came to be despite the diligent work Dr. J. Allen Hynek, a scientist who became convinced that we truly could not identify some objects in our skies, and kept pushing throughout his life for a scientific explanation, while keeping open every possibility, some of them way further out there than little green men.

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Hynek’s Last Contract with the Project Blue Book UFO Program

J Allen Hynek

     Mark O’Connell’s The Close Encounters Manexamines the astronomer J. Allen Hynek’s scientific career and his parallel work in UFO research. O’Connell shows how Hynek, a skeptical advisor to the US Air Force’s UFO Projects SIGN, Grudge, and Blue Book, became an advocate for serious UFO studies and the founder the Center for UFO Studies.

Project 1947 looks at the Hynek’s last contract with the USAF Project Blue Book UFO program. It wasn’t to be Hynek’s last USAF contract. After the Condon report, Hynek submitted a proposal to Col. George R.

Jan Aldrich

By Jan Aldrich
The UFO Chronicles
7-7-17

Weinbrenner, Commander of the Foreign Technology Division at Wright-Patterson AFB to do a special study of UFOs. Col. Weinbrenner had invited such a proposal, perhaps as a diplomatic sop to Hynek at the end of his last contract or perhaps as a completely serious offer. However, indications were that Weinbrenner was supposedly sympathetic to UFO research. What the result of the Hynek’s proposal was continues to be unknown, but he was contracted by the Air Force for some work for the next four years 1970-1974.

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Viral ‘Alien Video’ (Easily) Proven a HOAX

Viral 'Alien Video' (Easily) Proven a HOAX

     … the various copies of this video can easily be traced back to an original upload to Youtube on 6 July 2016 by Canadian visual effects artists Aristomenis Tsirbas (“Meni Tsirbas”) of MeniThings Productions. Meni Tsirbas has been a digital artist on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,
By Isaac Koi
www.isaackoi.com
8-25-16

Star Trek: Voyager, Star Trek: Enterprise, various movies (including Hellboy and Titanic) and other projects. This is not his first excursion into the field of ufology. Meni was responsible for direction, animation and lighting of another well-known UFO hoax (see “UFO over Santa Clarita” on the page Koi UFO Video 080). He admitted that hoax and posted a video effects breakdown of it years ago and is well known as the creator of viral/hoax videos. His other uploads to the same Youtube account include an amusing viral video of a flying car. I find it somewhat bemusing that anyone could spent 5 minutes watching the video but not bother spending 1 minute looking into the uploader of the video, which would easily reveal these facts. I’m regularly bemused by the conduct of some people in ufology… So many things within ufology are the basis of speculation when a little bit of work reveals relevant facts. This applies to government documents in various archives as much as it does to “UFO” videos on Youtube.

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Top 5 Strangest Paranormal Military Projects

5 strange military projects involving UFOs, time travel, psychic powers, a mysterious crash at Roswell and the paranormal… Subscribe to Dark5 ► http://bit.ly/dark5?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss

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5 Most Secret Military Aircraft ► https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJ0I773sFbw&index=4&list=PL5_Wlsif8uKta_8Fe8oyHJfmH_MpxRl6D&utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss
5 Sci-fi Weapons that Actually Exist ► https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=caH2pspeEFc&list=PL5_Wlsif8uKta_8Fe8oyHJfmH_MpxRl6D&index=15&utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss
5 Strangest Photos of World War II ► https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofI7D2Faivw&index=2&list=PL5_Wlsif8uKta_8Fe8oyHJfmH_MpxRl6D&utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss

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Project Blue Book: http://bit.ly/1cOAnWx?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss
Operation Paperclip: http://1.usa.gov/14OuxkS?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss
Project Stargate: http://bit.ly/14M8SKm?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss

Intro and Outro: “The Machine Thinks” and “Controlled Chaos”
Music: “Blown Away”
by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss

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10 Tips When Investigating a Flying Saucer

10 Tips When Investigating a Flying Saucer

By The CIA
1021016

1. Establish a Group To Investigate and Evaluate Sightings

Before December 1947, there was no specific organization tasked with the responsibility for investigating and evaluating UFO sightings. There were no standards on how to evaluate reports coming in, nor were there any measurable data points or results from controlled experiment for comparison against reported sightings.

To end the confusion, head of the Air Force Technical Service Command, General Nathan Twining, established Project SIGN (initially named Project SAUCER) in 1948 to collect, collate, evaluate, and distribute within the government all information relating to such sightings, on the premise that UFOs might be real (although not necessarily extraterrestrial) and of national security concern. Project SIGN eventually gave way to Project GRUDGE, which finally turned into Project BLUE BOOK in 1952.

2. Determine the Objectives of Your Investigation

The CIA’s concern over UFOs was substantial until the early 1950s because of the potential threat to national security from these unidentified flying objects. Most officials did not believe the sightings were extraterrestrial in origin; they were instead concerned the UFOs might be new Soviet weapons.

The Project BLUE BOOK team, according to Quintanilla, defined three main objectives for their investigations:

• To determine if UFO phenomena present a threat to the security of the US;

• To determine if UFO phenomena exhibit any technological advances which could be channeled into US research and development; and

• To explain or identify the stimuli which caused the observer to report a UFO.

Although BLUE BOOK, like previous investigative projects on the topic, did not rule out the possibility of extraterrestrial phenomena, their research and investigations focused primarily on national security implications, especially possible Soviet technological advancements.

3. Consult With Experts

Throughout the 1950s and 1960s, various projects, panels, and other studies were led or sponsored by the US government to research the UFO phenomenon. This includes the CIA-sponsored 1953 Scientific Advisory Panel on Unidentified Flying Objects, also known as the “Robertson Panel.” It was named after the noted physicist H.P. Robertson from the California Institute of Technology, who helped put together the distinguished panel of nonmilitary scientists to study the UFO issue.

Project BLUE BOOK also frequently consulted with outside experts, including: astrophysicists, Federal Aviation officials, pilots, the US Weather Bureau, local weather stations, academics, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, NASA, Kodak (for photo analysis), and various laboratories (for physical specimens). Even the famous astronomer Carl Sagan took part in a panel to review Project BLUE BOOK’s findings in the mid-1960s. The report from that panel concluded that “no UFO case which represented technological or scientific advances outside of a terrestrial framework” had been found, but the committee did recommend that UFOs be studied intensively to settle the issue once and for all.

4. Create a Reporting System To Organize Incoming Cases

The US Air Force’s Air Technical Intelligence Center (ATIC) developed questionnaires to be used when taking reports of possible UFO sightings, which were used throughout the duration of Project BLUE BOOK. The forms were used to provide the investigators enough information to determine what the unknown phenomenon most likely was. The duration of the sighting, the date, time, location, or position in the sky, weather conditions, and the manner of appearance or disappearance are essential clues for investigators evaluating reported UFO sightings.

Project BLUE BOOK categorized sightings according to what the team suspected they were attributable to: Astronomical (including bright stars, planets, comets, fireballs, meteors, and auroral streamers); Aircraft (propeller aircraft, jet aircraft, refueling missions, photo aircraft, advertising aircraft, helicopters); Balloons; Satellites; Other (including missiles, reflections, mirages, searchlights, birds, kites, spurious radar indications, hoaxes, fireworks, and flares); Insufficient Data; and finally, Unidentified.

According to Quintanilla, “a sighting is considered unidentified when a report apparently contains all the data necessary to suggest a valid hypothesis, but its description cannot be correlated with any known object or phenomenon.”

5. Eliminate False Positives

Eliminate each of the known and probable causes of UFO sightings, leaving a small portion of “unexplained” cases to focus on. By ruling out common explanations, investigators can focus on the truly mysterious cases.

Some common explanations for UFO sightings discovered by early investigations included: misidentified aircrafts (the U-2, A-12, and SR-71 flights accounted for more than half of all UFO reports from the late 1950s and most of the 1960s); celestial events; mass hysteria and hallucination; “war hysteria;” “midsummer madness;” hoaxes; publicity stunts; and the misinterpretation of known objects.

Even history can shed some light. An interesting citation found by the 1953 Robertson Panel noted that some sightings had been attributed to an older phenomenon – “Foo Fighters” – that pre-dated the modern concept of UFOs: “These were unexplained phenomena sighted by aircraft pilots during World War II in both European and Far East theaters of operation wherein ‘balls of light’ would fly near or with the aircraft and maneuver rapidly. They were believed to be electrostatic (similar to St. Elmo’s fire) or electromagnetic phenomena… but their exact cause or nature was never defined. If the term ‘flying saucers’ had been popular in 1943-1945, these objects would have been so labeled.”

6. Develop Methodology To Identify Common Aircraft and Other Aerial Phenomena Often Mistaken for UFOs

Because of the significant likelihood a common (or secret military) aircraft could be mistaken for a UFO, it’s important to know the characteristics of different types of aircraft and aerial phenomenon to evaluate against each sighting. To help investigators go through the troves of reports coming in, Project BLUE BOOK developed a methodology to determine if the UFO sighting could likely be attributable to a known aircraft or aerial phenomenon. They wrote up detailed descriptions characterizing each type of aircraft or astronomical phenomenon, including how it might be mistaken for a UFO, to help investigators evaluate the incoming reports.

7. Examine Witness Documentation

Any photographs, videos, or audio recordings can be immensely helpful in evaluating a reported UFO sighting.

A famous case examined by the Robertson Panel was the “Tremonton, Utah Sighting” of 1952, where a couple and two children traveling cross-country on State Highway 30 outside of Tremonton saw what appeared to be 10-12 bright shining objects moving westward in the sky in a rough formation. The husband was able to capture some of the objects on film.

The case was considered significant because of the “excellent documentary evidence in the form of Kodachrome motion picture films (about 1600 frames).” The Panel examined the film, case history, ATIC’s interpretation, and received a briefing from representatives of the USN Photo Interpretation Laboratory on their analysis of the film. The laboratory believed the objects were not birds, balloons, aircraft, or reflections, and therefore had to be “self-luminous.” The panel disagreed with the assessment that the objects were self-luminous, believing that if a controlled experiment was conducted, a terrestrial explanation for the sighting would be confirmed.

8. Conduct Controlled Experiments

As suggested by the Robertson Panel for investigating the Tremonton, Utah sighting (mentioned in tip #7), controlled experiments might be required to try and replicate the unknown phenomena. In the Tremonton case, the Panel suggested an experiment where scientists would photograph “pillow balloons” at different distances under similar weather conditions at the site. They believed such an experiment could help dispel the “self-luminous” theory about the objects in the film. Unfortunately, in this case, the cost of conducting such an experiment made the idea unfeasible.

9. Gather and Test Physical and Forensic Evidence

In the Zamora case (from the introduction), Quintanilla contends that during the course of the investigation and immediately thereafter, “everything that was humanly possible to verify was checked.” This included bringing in Geiger counters from Kirtland Air Force Base to test for radiation in the landing area and sending soil samples to the Air Force Materials Laboratory. “The soil analysis disclosed no foreign material. Radiation was normal for the ‘tracks’ and surrounding area. Laboratory analysis of the burned brush showed no chemicals that could have been propellant residue,” according to Quintanilla. “The findings were all together negative.” No known explanation could be found for the mysterious event.

10. Discourage False Reporting

The Robertson Panel found that the Air Force had “instituted a fine channel for receiving reports of nearly anything anyone sees in the sky and fails to understand.” This is a classic example of needing to separate the “signal from the noise.” If you have too many false or junk reports, it becomes increasingly difficult to find the few good ones worthy of investigation or attention.

The CIA in the early 1950s was concerned that because of the tense Cold War situation and increased Soviet capabilities, the Soviets could use UFO reports to ignite mass panic and hysteria. Even worse, the Soviets could use UFO sightings to overload the US air warning system so that it could not distinguish real targets from supposed UFOs.

In order to lessen the amount of false-positive reports, the Robertson Panel suggested educating the military, researchers, and even the public on how to identify objects or phenomena commonly mistaken for UFOs. For example, they recommended training enlisted, command, and research personnel on how to properly recognize unusually illuminated objects (like balloons or aircraft reflections), as well as natural phenomena (such as meteors, fireballs, mirages, or noctilucent “night” clouds). By knowing how to correctly recognize objects that were commonly mistaken for UFOs, investigators could quickly eliminate false reports and focus on identifying those sightings which remained unexplained.

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181. James Fox

james-foxRecorded Live 12-16-15, Alejandro Rojas with the news, and James Fox talks about his upcoming movie, 701, and what it was like interviewing incredible witnesses for Out of the Blue, I Know What I saw and more. He further discusses the danger of having UFO evidence, and cases involving close encounters of the third kind, he says his best footage is yet to be released and you can look forward to it in 701 in the next year or two!  For more info, go to the show notes below. If you have not become a supporter for only $2 per month or more, you will really want to for the second part of this interview.

Show Notes

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