Tag Archives: discovery

Finding Proof of Space Aliens, What Happens Next?

Finding Proof of Space Aliens, What Happens Next?

Protocols for responding to the discovery of extraterrestrial
intelligence have been created, but they might not be followed.

     First came the suggestion that an “alien megastructure” had been observed around KIC 8462852, a.k.a. Tabby’s Star. Months later, people were talking about a signal seen by a Russian telescope that some thought was transmitted from the environs of a stellar cousin of
By Seth Shostak
NBC News
8-1-17

the sun. And not long after that, the Cyclopean Arecibo antenna in Puerto Rico reported weird signals that seemed to come from the dwarf star Ross 128, a scant 11 light-years away.

[…]

These three claims purporting to show the existence of aliens haven’t panned out. But what happens if some future claim does? What preparations are in place to deal with the discovery of a radio signal or a laser flash that would prove beyond doubt that we have cosmic compeers? Does the government have a plan? Does anyone?

[…]

… Back in 1989, when a now-defunct NASA program to search for extraterrestrial intelligence was gaining steam, protocols were drafted to spell out best practices in case the search proved successful. These were later updated and streamlined by the International Academy of Astronautics SETI Permanent Committee. (Click here to see the revised protocols.)

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Oxygen Producing Comet Found in Deep Space

Rosetta Navigation Camera Image of Comet 67P

The finding shows that oxygen can be generated in space without the need for life, and could influence how researchers search for signs of life on exoplanets.

     In 2015, scientists announced the detection molecular oxygen at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which was studied by the Rosetta spacecraft. It was the “biggest surprise of the mission,” they said — a discovery that could change our understanding of how the solar system formed.
By Nancy Atkinson
Seeker.com
5-10-17

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Sorry, UFO Fans – NASA Says No Aliens … Yet

Sorry, UFO Fans – NASA Says No Aliens ... Yet

Conspiracy theorists believe that NASA has been in cahoots with the little green men for decades – and yesterday the wilder parts of the internet went (even more) nuts.

     A video supposedly posted by hacktivist collective Anonymous claimed NASA was ‘on the brink’ of revealing contact with aliens.

But NASA has stepped in to say that they’re not going to be doing a press conference with the little green men any time soon.

By Rob WaughRob Waugh
Metro.co.uk
6-27-17

Dr Thomas Zurbuchen, Associate Administrator, NASA Science Mission Directorate, said, ‘Contrary to some reports, there’s no pending announcement from NASA regarding extraterrestrial life.’

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‘Evidence of Alien Life’ To Be Released By NASA? | VIDEO

'Evidence of Alien Life' To Be Released By NASA?

     HUMANS are about to discover alien life, Nasa believes – according to the latest video from hacktivist group Anonymous.

The hackers published YouTube clip which claims a Nasa scientist

By Laura Burnip
The Sun
6-25-17

made the announcement at the last meeting of the US Science, Space and Technology committee.

It comes after Nasa’s Kepler space observatory discovered 219 “potential new worlds” in other solar systems.

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Lifeforms Possible On Newly Discovered Planets, Says Michio Kaku | VIDEO

Artist's Conception of TRAPPIST-1 Planetary System

     NASA announced the discovery of seven Earth-sized planets around a star about 40 light years away from Earth. All seven could have water, which is key to life like ours, and three of them fall in the habitable zone.
CBS News
2-23-17

Michio Kaku, CBS News science and futurist contributor and physics professor at the City University of New York, joins “CBS This Morning” with more on this new discovery.

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Alien Life? NASA Announces 7 Earth-Size, Habitable-Zone Planets Around Single Star



Alien Life? NASA Announces 7 Earth-Size, Habitable-Zone Planets Around Single Star
This illustration shows the possible surface of TRAPPIST-1f, one of the newly discovered planets in the TRAPPIST-1 system. Scientists using the Spitzer Space Telescope and ground-based telescopes have discovered that there are seven Earth-size planets in the system.

     NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed the first known system of seven Earth-size planets around a single star. Three of these planets are firmly located in the habitable zone, the area around the parent star where a rocky planet is most likely to have liquid water.
By NASA
2-22-17

The discovery sets a new record for greatest number of habitable-zone planets found around a single star outside our solar system. All of these seven planets could have liquid water – key to life as we know it – under the right atmospheric conditions, but the chances are highest with the three in the habitable zone.

“This discovery could be a significant piece in the puzzle of finding habitable environments, places that are conducive to life,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. “Answering the question ‘are we alone’ is a top science priority and finding so many planets like these for the first time in the habitable zone is a remarkable step forward toward that goal.”

Seven Earth-sized planets have been observed by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope around a tiny, nearby, ultra-cool dwarf star called TRAPPIST-1. Three of these planets are firmly in the habitable zone. Credits: NASA

At about 40 light-years (235 trillion miles) from Earth, the system of planets is relatively close to us, in the constellation Aquarius. Because they are located outside of our solar system, these planets are scientifically known as exoplanets.

This exoplanet system is called TRAPPIST-1, named for The Transiting Planets and Planetesimals Small Telescope (TRAPPIST) in Chile. In May 2016, researchers using TRAPPIST announced they had discovered three planets in the system. Assisted by several ground-based telescopes, including the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope, Spitzer confirmed the existence of two of these planets and discovered five additional ones, increasing the number of known planets in the system to seven.

The new results were published Wednesday in the journal Nature, and announced at a news briefing at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

Using Spitzer data, the team precisely measured the sizes of the seven planets and developed first estimates of the masses of six of them, allowing their density to be estimated.

Based on their densities, all of the TRAPPIST-1 planets are likely to be rocky. Further observations will not only help determine whether they are rich in water, but also possibly reveal whether any could have liquid water on their surfaces. The mass of the seventh and farthest exoplanet has not yet been estimated – scientists believe it could be an icy, “snowball-like” world, but further observations are needed.

“The seven wonders of TRAPPIST-1 are the first Earth-size planets that have been found orbiting this kind of star,” said Michael Gillon, lead author of the paper and the principal investigator of the TRAPPIST exoplanet survey at the University of Liege, Belgium. “It is also the best target yet for studying the atmospheres of potentially habitable, Earth-size worlds.”

TRAPPIST-1 planets
This artist’s concept shows what each of the TRAPPIST-1 planets may look like, based on available data about their sizes, masses and orbital distances.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

In contrast to our sun, the TRAPPIST-1 star – classified as an ultra-cool dwarf – is so cool that liquid water could survive on planets orbiting very close to it, closer than is possible on planets in our solar system. All seven of the TRAPPIST-1 planetary orbits are closer to their host star than Mercury is to our sun. The planets also are very close to each other. If a person was standing on one of the planet’s surface, they could gaze up and potentially see geological features or clouds of neighboring worlds, which would sometimes appear larger than the moon in Earth’s sky.

The planets may also be tidally locked to their star, which means the same side of the planet is always facing the star, therefore each side is either perpetual day or night. This could mean they have weather patterns totally unlike those on Earth, such as strong winds blowing from the day side to the night side, and extreme temperature changes.

Spitzer, an infrared telescope that trails Earth as it orbits the sun, was well-suited for studying TRAPPIST-1 because the star glows brightest in infrared light, whose wavelengths are longer than the eye can see. In the fall of 2016, Spitzer observed TRAPPIST-1 nearly continuously for 500 hours. Spitzer is uniquely positioned in its orbit to observe enough crossing – transits – of the planets in front of the host star to reveal the complex architecture of the system. Engineers optimized Spitzer’s ability to observe transiting planets during Spitzer’s “warm mission,” which began after the spacecraft’s coolant ran out as planned after the first five years of operations.

“This is the most exciting result I have seen in the 14 years of Spitzer operations,” said Sean Carey, manager of NASA’s Spitzer Science Center at Caltech/IPAC in Pasadena, California. “Spitzer will follow up in the fall to further refine our understanding of these planets so that the James Webb Space Telescope can follow up. More observations of the system are sure to reveal more secrets.”

Following up on the Spitzer discovery, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has initiated the screening of four of the planets, including the three inside the habitable zone. These observations aim at assessing the presence of puffy, hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, typical for gaseous worlds like Neptune, around these planets.

This 360-degree panorama depicts the surface of a newly detected planet, TRAPPIST 1-d, part of a seven planet system some 40 light years away. Explore this artist’s rendering of an alien world by moving the view using your mouse or your mobile device. Credits: NASA

In May 2016, the Hubble team observed the two innermost planets, and found no evidence for such puffy atmospheres. This strengthened the case that the planets closest to the star are rocky in nature.

“The TRAPPIST-1 system provides one of the best opportunities in the next decade to study the atmospheres around Earth-size planets,” said Nikole Lewis, co-leader of the Hubble study and astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Maryland. NASA’s planet-hunting Kepler space telescope also is studying the TRAPPIST-1 system, making measurements of the star’s minuscule changes in brightness due to transiting planets. Operating as the K2 mission, the spacecraft’s observations will allow astronomers to refine the properties of the known planets, as well as search for additional planets in the system. The K2 observations conclude in early March and will be made available on the public archive.

Spitzer, Hubble, and Kepler will help astronomers plan for follow-up studies using NASA’s upcoming James Webb Space Telescope, launching in 2018. With much greater sensitivity, Webb will be able to detect the chemical fingerprints of water, methane, oxygen, ozone, and other components of a planet’s atmosphere. Webb also will analyze planets’ temperatures and surface pressures – key factors in assessing their habitability.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, manages the Spitzer Space Telescope mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate. Science operations are conducted at the Spitzer Science Center, at Caltech, in Pasadena, California. Spacecraft operations are based at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Littleton, Colorado. Data are archived at the Infrared Science Archive housed at Caltech/IPAC. Caltech manages JPL for NASA.

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New Star Trek Series Has Begun Filming (Video)



New Star Trek Series Has Begun Filming

     After 12 years off the air, Star Trek will finally soar back onto our screens in Discovery, a new show that will stream exclusively on CBS All Access — and on #Netflix for international viewers. So far, the news has been rather difficult to follow, with #StarTrekDiscovery being pushed
By Eleanor Tremeer
moviepilot.com
2-8-17

back twice already, and precious little plot details available so far. And yet, there’s a lot we can glean from tiny hints buried in the numerous press releases, so here’s your ultimate guide to Star Trek: Discovery!

Continue Reading ►

The musical theme for Star Trek: Discovery’s opening credits may have been revealed via Twitter.

See Also:

‘Star Trek’ Tech Here and Now

‘Star Trek’ Creator Gene Roddenberry’s Lost Data Recovered

Star Trek’s Leonard Nimoy Has Died at 83

REPORT YOUR UFO EXPERIENCE

Read more »

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New Star Trek Series Has Begun Filming (Video)



New Star Trek Series Has Begun Filming

     After 12 years off the air, Star Trek will finally soar back onto our screens in Discovery, a new show that will stream exclusively on CBS All Access — and on #Netflix for international viewers. So far, the news has been rather difficult to follow, with #StarTrekDiscovery being pushed
By Eleanor Tremeer
moviepilot.com
2-8-17

back twice already, and precious little plot details available so far. And yet, there’s a lot we can glean from tiny hints buried in the numerous press releases, so here’s your ultimate guide to Star Trek: Discovery!

Continue Reading ►

The musical theme for Star Trek: Discovery’s opening credits may have been revealed via Twitter.

See Also:

‘Star Trek’ Tech Here and Now

‘Star Trek’ Creator Gene Roddenberry’s Lost Data Recovered

Star Trek’s Leonard Nimoy Has Died at 83

REPORT YOUR UFO EXPERIENCE

Read more »

Read More

Is There Alien Life on Dwarf Planet, Ceres?

Is There Alien Life on Dwarf Planet, Ceres?

     SCIENTISTS have discovered an abundance of water ice on the dwarf planet Ceres, suggesting it could potentially be home to alien life.
By Sean Martin
The Daily Express
12-16-16

The tiny sub-planet, which is found in the asteroid belt situated between Mars and Jupiter, has been found to have water ice on its crust, which points to more beneath the surface.

The study, published in the journal Nature Astronomy, shows that Ceres is 10 per cent water ice – which could point to the dwarf planet either currently being habitable, or was once habitable, experts say.

The discovery makes it one of many extraterrestrial bodies that has, or has had, water on it, including Mars, Saturn’s moons Europa and Enceladus, Jupiter’s moon Ganymede and another dwarf planet in Pluto.

Most scientists agree that the location of the water on the sub-planet massively increases the chances of finding life.

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