Tag Archives: By Curt Collins

Lost UFO Films: Socorro and Frank Stranges

Lost UFO Films: Socorro and Frank Stranges

     The Reverend Frank E. Stranges passed on in 2008, but he is fondly remembered.
By Curt Collins
thesaucersthattimeforgot.blogspot.com
12-8-17

“No one knows this more than Dr. Frank E. Stranges. This erudite, holding degrees in Theology, Criminology and Psychology, has dedicated his life to the study of the Bible and other sacred texts in relationship to spiritual growth and understanding not only of our planet and its people, but also of those from other worlds.”

So says his bio/obit at ISUIS. Dr. Stranges also made a few UFO film projects, but it’s the missing ones that may matter the most. Here’s a news item on his lecture promoting his UFO documentary Phenomena 7.7 from the Redlands Daily Facts (CA) March 5, 1965:

Saucers—Fact or Fiction … announcing a lecture by Dr. Frank E. Stranges, president of the International Evangelism Crusades… Frank Stranges has just completed work on a color documentary film entitled, “Phenomena 7.7.” It will be released to movie and television shortly… Versed in many fields of interest. Dr. Stranges will lecture on flying saucers.

[…]

Phenomena 7.7 included a rare filmed segment on one of the most compelling unexplained UFO sightings of all time, the 1964 Lonnie Zamora encounter in Socorro, New Mexico.

Read more »

Read More

Hocus Pocus: The Roswell Slides Return

Hocus Pocus: The Roswell Slides Return

      A mainstream media piece by The Guardian from the UK is worth a look for it’s portrayal of one of ufology’s biggest embarrassments. “The Curious Case Of The Alien In The Photo And A Mystery That Took Years To Solve,” written by Les Carpenter, a sports journalist, it sympathetically presents the Roswell Slides story from the POV of the promoter of the events, Adam Dew. There, Dew finally names and discloses the role of his silent partner, Joseph Beason. I’m not sure just why the story was newsworthy at this late date, but it does contain a few new bits, chiefly quotes from the perpetrators, and is the first interview with Dew since the events. It’s a nice
Curt Collins

By Curt Collins
www.blueblurrylines.com
10-2-17

piece, but there are a few things that need to be clarified, and a few errors that need to be corrected.

Don Schmitt & Tom Carey
I was struck by the lack citation of sources in the article, or links to the source material, but the narrative is more accurate than not. The coverage of the deblurring of the Slides is shortchanged and there’s a only a brief mention of the Roswell Slides Research Group and Nab Lator (who is called Neb). Instead, the story is all about how Adam Dew was drawn into the circus, and how two Roswell ufologists let belief lead their investigation.

Hocus Pocus?

The ufologists in the story, Tom Carey and Donald Schmitt, look bad, making unsubstantiated accusations that they were victims. “It was a very sophisticated hoax,” Carey says. “Dew manipulated the slides. The one clue we couldn’t figure out was the placard, but they played hocus pocus with the placard. We were given something that had been altered.” The story says, “Humiliated, Carey and Schmitt apologized to the Roswell Slides debunkers.” No. RSRG member Tim Printy responded on Facebook, saying,

“It states that Carey and Schmitt apologized to the Roswell slides debunkers. I don’t remember that apology. If it was given, it was some vague comment they made with little meaning. I also see that Carey and Schmitt still believe that the slides were altered by Dew. This is a lie and they are just fooling themselves. Rudiak claimed he could deblur his placard and we know that we could deblur Bragalia’s. The problem with Carey and Schmitt is they believe they were too smart to not figure it out. Instead, they were just stupid UFOlogists stuck in the will to believe in the myth they created.”

Printy is correct. Carey and Schmitt’s claim that they received deceptive, manipulated versions of the scans is false. On the April 20, 2015, KGRA show, Fade to Black, a few weeks before BeWitness, Tom Carey said he was sent a high resolution version of the two Slides, and he describes both pictures in detail, the placard and the man and woman seen behind the body. (In other words, the museum setting was pictured.)

Video: “Ep. 241 FADE to BLACK Jimmy Church w/ Tom Carey, UFO Roswell Slides LIVE on air”
Carey, on receiving the Slides by email: 131:30, describing Slides images: 137 and 140.

Roswell Slides Placard AKA Mummified Body of Two-Year-Old Boy

Portions of those same scans were sent to David Rudiak and Anthony Bragalia in an attempt to read the placard. After the RSRG deblurred the placard, those scans were made public, and they could be deblurred and read just as easily. The charges of digital manipulation of the slides against Dew and Beason are false. However Dew admits to exploitation being “guilty of not discouraging the talk [of it being alien]. It was good for the project.”

Accusations, Trolls and Rewriting History

Beason's Accusations of the RSRG Ffaking the Deblurring with Photoshop.
Beason’s Accusations of the RSRG Ffaking the Deblurring with Photoshop.
( – click and or right click to enlarge -)

BeWitness, Dew's clip of the Nov. 2013 meeting in Chicago
BeWitness, Dew’s clip of the Nov. 2013 meeting in Chicago

The story confirms that after the deblurring, it was Beason who the RSRG was corresponding with, not Dew and Beason who posted at Slidebox Media the RSRG were “internet UFO Trolls” hoaxing the placard. It was later toned down, and proven to be false, but no apology from Beason was offered. The Slidebox site, http://www.slideboxmedia.com, is now dead, but the YouTube account remains. It’s reported that “Beason has moved on.”

The most glaring distortion in the Guardian itself is the claim that the show was a last-minute 2015 decision made as a last resort:

“By early 2015, Beason and Dew knew they had no choice but to reveal the slides. The pressure to do so was extreme and Dew needed money to fund his documentary… The only appealing proposal came from Jamie Maussan, an investigative journalist based in Mexico City.”

This is inaccurate. At BeWitness, Dew showed a clip documenting how the deal deal was brokered in November 2013, with Carey, Schmitt and Maussan traveling to Chicago for the signing the partnership arrangement.

Old Dogs, Old Tricks

The best quote in the Guardian story is how the investigation went off the rails. The pictures looked alien to them, and after pursuing details on Hilda Blair Ray’s past, Dew said, “You start to fill in the blanks.” Those blanks were filled with wishful thinking instead of evidence.

BeWitness promoter Jaime Maussan didn’t get much coverage in the article, and it’s almost sad that “World-famous researcher” Anthony Bragalia who dreamed up much of the Slides narrative was not even mentioned.

If at first you don't succeed...
If at first you don’t succeed…

Jaime Maussan has never given up on the Slides and continues to promote them, and has since used some of the same “experts” to promote a series of Peruvian mummies as alien bodies. The enterprise was was heavily promoted and exploited by the subscription-based video service Gaia, that bills itself as “a member-supported conscious media company.” For further details, see The Atlantic’s article, “The Racism Behind Alien Mummy Hoaxes by Christopher Heaney,” Aug. 1, 2017

The new Guardian piece closes by saying that Dew intends to complete his documentary, Kodachrome, but otherwise life goes on. Of Carey and Schmitt, Dew says, “They got their hopes up,” but “will never get the answers they are looking for.”

There’s an interesting question that may not have been asked. Let’s assume Beason was sincere in approaching Carey and Schmitt, asking “I want you to help verify” the Slides. If so, doesn’t Slidebox Media, LLC have a case against Carey and Schmitt for failure to perform the contracted duty? None of the evidence produced in support of the Slides as alien turned out to be accurate.
For an insider’s look of the story of the investigation and exposure of the BeWitness fiasco, there’s my essay on the Roswell Slides Research Group in UFOs: Reframing the Debate, “What’s Wrong With This Picture?”Further details on that in a previous article, “UFOs: Reframing the Roswell Slides Fiasco.”

Read more »

Read More

Gen. Curtis LeMay on UFOs over Ancient Egypt

General Curtis LeMay, UFOs and Ancient Egypt

     General Curtis LeMay was a larger than life figure who rose to prominence through his command of bombers in the second World War, and and afterwards for his development of the United States’ armed warfare during the Cold War. For an overview of his military career, see the biography at the Air Force’s site.
By Curt Collins
thesaucersthattimeforgot
9-26-17

[…]

To UFO buffs, Gen. LeMay is best known for his role in the anecdote that Senator Barry Goldwater told….

Remarks at a Rodeo

Gen. Curtis LeMay, asked what he thought about flying saucers, replied:

“The best information in my opinion on them is to be found in a book written by an Englishman explaining numerous such mysteries. He says that the first flying saucers were seen in Egypt about the year 3,000 B. C.”

Read more »

Read More

UFO Crashes Near Crystal Springs, MS | UFO CHRONICLE –- 1950

Flying Saucer Crashes Near Crystal Springs (Heading) 5-13-1950

      Bobby Mohon called the Jackson paper late Friday night from Crystal Springs with the story of how a flying saucer had struck a power company transformer on the night of May 12, causing an electrical outage in the city. He reported mangled bodies laying near the wreckage which had markings indicating it was an unusual military
By Curt Collins
Saucers That Time Forgot
8-4-17

aircraft. In 1950, the term “UFO” had not yet come into usage, and “flying saucer” was used for unidentified flying objects of any shape. Mohon’s saucer was actually described as cylindrical, and “definitely not an airplane.” The Clarion Ledger scooped the nation with the saucer news, and credited the witness as co-author of the story, along with reporter Tommy E. Hederman.

The story was rushed to press and was on sale Saturday morning before all the facts were in. The investigation by Crystal Springs authorities was reported later the same day by other area news papers.

Read more »

Read More

Dr. J. Allen Hynek: Ufology is a Mess

J Allen Hynek

     “Ufology today is in the state I would say chemistry was when chemistry was alchemy, a mixture of superstition, wild ideas, unproved claims, and yet out of that whole mess, finally the very first class science of chemistry evolved. And I think the same thing is going to happen eventually with Ufology, but right now, it is a mess. …”
By Curt Collins
Blue Blurry Lines
6-30-17

Read more »

Read More

UFO Contact in Loco, Texas – April 1, 1967

UFO Contact in Loco, Texas – April 1, 1967

      Carroll Wayne Watts said he had a close encounter with a UFO the night of March 31, 1967, but it was not reported until the following day, on April 1. Watts lived in the tiny town of Loco, in the Texas Panhandle, just south of Wellington, about 100 miles east of
By Curt Collins
www.blueblurrylines.com
3-31-17

Amarillo. His story was carried in United Press International news service, UPI, and published March 2, as reprinted below:

Saucer Speaks

A Wellington farmer said today that he spoke to a flying saucer last night. The man, Carroll Watts, said he was returning home from his father`s residence about a mile north of his home at about 10:30 Friday night when he saw a light from about where an abandoned house stands.

He turned off the dirt road and headed toward the light. He said he drove to within about 20 feet of an object which “appeared to be about 100 feet long and eight or ten feet high.”

Read more »

Read More

UFOs, Kenneth Arnold and the American Bible

Bookmark and Sharevar addthis_config = {“data_track_clickback”:true};



UFOs, Kenneth Arnold and the American Bible

     Kenneth Arnold was the original credible witness, a straight-shooting, down-to-earth ex-Boy Scout. Jacques Vallee wrote, “I now think of referring to the (flying saucer) problem as ‘the Arnold Phenomenon’ after that celebrated witness, businessman Kenneth
By Curt Collins
www.blueblurrylines.com
3-15-17

Arnold.” (11 April 1963 entry, Forbidden Science Volume I.) However, in the years since, Arnold’s role as the herald of the UFO age has been diminished by the overemphasis and promotion of the Roswell crash franchise. His role is important, and there’s a lot more to his story.

Shortly after his encounter, Arnold had the first of many other sightings on his flight to Maury Island, a trip that began his informal role as the first civilian UFO investigator. He became interested in Charles Fort’s books of phenomena and joined the Fortean Society. Over the years, he came to believe that the objects he’d seen were living creatures, possibly related to what Ezekiel had described in the Book of Revelation. There’s a lot more to Kenneth Arnold’s story than just his first sighting, but UFO history has largely ignored the story.

Read more »

Read More

The Attack on Ufology’s Isaac Koi

The Attack on Isaac Koi

     Isaac Koi is a well-known researcher from the UK working to preserve and share UFO literature and documents, with the stated purpose of making them freely available to all. Isaac is known personally by a few trusted colleagues, but uses a pseudonym while
By Curt Collins
Blue Blurry Lines
12-4-16

working in the UFO community in order to protect his career. Recently, exposure of his identity has been threatened, causing him to announce that he was leaving UFO research.

Here’s how it came to be.

Read more »

Read More

The Attack on Ufology’s Isaac Koi

The Attack on Isaac Koi

     Isaac Koi is a well-known researcher from the UK working to preserve and share UFO literature and documents, with the stated purpose of making them freely available to all. Isaac is known personally by a few trusted colleagues, but uses a pseudonym while
By Curt Collins
Blue Blurry Lines
12-4-16

working in the UFO community in order to protect his career. Recently, exposure of his identity has been threatened, causing him to announce that he was leaving UFO research.

Here’s how it came to be.

Read more »

Read More

Bad UFOs by Robert Sheaffer – A Review

Bad UFOs

By Curt Collins
www.blueblurrylines.com
1-26-16

      Robert Sheaffer has been covering the UFO beat a long time, reading the literature, attending conferences, corresponding, debating with the players, and has become a part of its history. In the book,“Bad UFOs: Critical Thinking About UFO Claims,” Sheaffer covers a range of UFO cases, topics and personalties from the dawn of the era, up to recent events. Frankly, some of which read like a hall of shame, and it could have been titled, UFOlogy’s Greatest Misses.” I can picture some scoundrels in UFOtown tearing through the pages, praying that their products and names aren’t in it. Sheaffer does mention a few good eggs along the way, “UFO realists,” but as the title suggests, he’s focused on the bad ones.

Robert Sheaffer, meanie. That’s what some UFO buffs have heard, and skeptics and debunkers are supposed to be attacking the very existence of UFOs, close-minded to the point of denying the truth, and rumor has it that some of them are even discrediting witnesses and evidence. Trace those tales to the source, and you’ll see they originated with phonies who didn’t want their carnival act exposed, people like Silas Newton, George Adamski and Jaime Maussan. The truth is more complicated, but then, that’s why so few people bother with it.

What many UFO/ET proponents fail to appreciate about skeptics and debunkers is that the devils are observing the same kind of claims about extraordinary things on a range of other topics, not just UFOs. There’s more in common with UFOs, Ghost, Bigfoot and Nessie than the ET camp would like to admit, and it lies in the seeker. It’s about the quest for something extraordinary, with belief driving the investigation. The big problem there is that they regularly accept insubstantial evidence if it bolsters their beliefs. Witness testimony is subject to great problems ranging from accuracy to authenticity, and the record of photo and physical evidence shows an alarmingly high tolerance for counterfeits. Sheaffer sees the absurdity and humor in the UFO circus, something the field seems incapable of seeing about itself. Worse, they seem incapable of dealing with frauds, and policing themselves. Like disgraced televangelists, if they have an apology or excuse, proven UFO scoundrels are welcomed back into the fold.

Bad UFOs - Table of Contents

One recurring theme in Sheaffer’s book is that a UFO claim surfaces, gets embraced by the ET camp, and then is fiercely defended against not only challenges to its authenticity, but even logical questions about it. They get sour when it falls flat, but they are willfully ignoring their own statistics. According to MUFON, 80 to 90% of UFO reports crumble after being investigated, the remnant serving to keep hope alive, designated as “unknowns.” By cherishing UFO stories before all the facts are in, frequent disappointments are assured.

Sheaffer holds up a mirror to the UFO circus, and many in it won’t like the picture. Where I disagree with Sheaffer is over the conclusion that the study of UFOs is futile. My personal opinion is that it ufology should work towards co-operating with existing astronomical and meteorological projects, instead of trying to re-invent or duplicate them. Sheaffer convincingly makes the case that the current value or purpose of UFO study is only self-perpetuation, promoting UFO beliefs: that there’s a mystery and behind it is ET visitation.

The book discusses several key cases, some in detail, others in passing, including famous sightings from Kenneth Arnold to Kenju Terauchi’s report of a giant spaceship to recent cases. In these, he points out the recurring problems with the evidence or the interpretation of it. So often, it comes down to stories, and looking at the alien abduction accounts from Betty and Barney Hill to Emma Woods, these incredible tales emerged through hypnosis. In other stories, like those of Roswell alien bodies and the conflicting claims at Rendlesham Forest, Sheaffer shows that many of the heavily-promoted UFO tales have plot holes, big black plot holes, big enough to swallow planet Nibru.

Chances are, if you are seeing this, you’ll read a UFO book or two this year, and “Bad UFOs” should be one of them. If you are used to taking UFO stories on faith alone, you may want to throw it across the room a few times. Instead, take one of the cases discussed and look up the documentation for it, and to see for yourself if the facts back up the legends you’ve been told about it. The cases that hold up to the challenges of skeptics are the one really worth pursuing.

About the UFOs being spacecraft, Sheaffer also reintroduces some hard scientific facts that many ET proponents don’t know, or choose to ignore about the overwhelming physical impracticality of interstellar space travel. Even folding or warping space seems out of the realm of possibility, and to make it work, something like magic must be needed. Just how are the visitors getting here? Perhaps believing is the key to seeing. Dr. Steven Greer can lead you through meditation to summon and communicate with ETI spacecraft. Sometimes, you won’t see them at first, but with patience, Greer can teach you how- for a price.

Sheaffer thinks that behind all the UFO stories, there’s nothing but cases of mistaken identity, wishful thinking and fraud. I hope he’s wrong, and that there is a rare, genuine phenomenon, whatever it is. I do agree, however, that the problems he discusses are severe and until UFOtown polices itself, it’ll remain a ghetto- or a ghost town.

Read more »

Read More