Tag Archives: By Billy Cox

If They Aliens Discover Us Before We Discover Them (Redux)

Talking the walk …

     Don’t know about you, but I’m loving those mystery lights on Ceres as NASA’s surveillance probe, Dawn, bears down on the biggest chunk of real estate in the asteroid belt. And not because of the prospects for discovering alien activity – they’re remote, at best – but because of the opportunity to witness, again, the ritual disconnect that characterizes institutional science whenever The Great Taboo legitimately insinuates itself into a news cycle.

Let’s go back a few years when, after half a century of logging zilch in the Great ET Radio Signal Experiment, SETI pioneer Jill Tarter proposed


By Billy Cox
De Void
6-24-15

a new name for their endeavors, the Search for Extraterrestrial Technology (SETT). This was a tacit grudging concession that maybe radio astronomers had been working with a flawed model. In 2011, the International Journal of Astrobiology published a paper by astrophysicists Martin Elvis and Duncan Forgan proposing an even more specific tack, that maybe Earthlings ought to consider scanning the asteroid belt for evidence of ET “macro-engineering projects.” Translation: mining operations. Made sense. After all, they noted, asteroids are repositories for raw material like gold, platinum and silver, the kind of stuff you’d likely need to repair or refuel extended planetary missions.

And, as Forgan would hypothesize two years later in the IJA, ET wouldn’t even have to bend the known laws of physics to reach the rocky debris zone between Jupiter and Mars, no matter which part of the Milky Way he/she/it came from. Upon crunching the numbers, Forgan and a mathematician hypothesized that robotic technologies could have mapped this galaxy well below light speeds, in about 10 million years. On the cosmic scale of time, that’s no big deal.

So here’s what’s going on. In 2007, NASA hurls an unmanned vehicle toward the asteroid belt to look for clues to the formation of our solar system. Destination: “dwarf planets” Vesta and Ceres. Dawn enters a 14-month mapping orbit over Vesta in 2011, then moves on toward the bigger prize. In February, as it closes to within 29,000 miles of Ceres, Dawn’s cameras detect something totally off the charts – lights on the surface. Their luminosity doesn’t appear to be significantly affected by different sun angles. Two months and 25,000 miles closer, their intensity is still unblinking. Planetary scientists are stumped; at the Jet Propulsion Lab’s website, PR flacks do a very savvy thing by letting visitors vote on the most likely suspects: “volcano,” “geyser,” “salt deposit,” “ice,” “rock,” and “other.” Wonder what “other” could be. Hmm. Anyway, we’ll get an even better peek by summer’s end, when Dawn dips to within 900 miles of the surface.

No matter what those lights are all about, this sort of suspense is cool. Talk about a teaching opportunity for schools.

Now let’s review some of NASA’s recent headline-grabbing statements. In 2014, given our ongoing exoplanet transiting searches and the impending exploration of more local worlds like Europa, space agency scientists predicted Earthlings will discover ET life within 20 years. That forecast was reiterated just last week at the Astrobiology Science Conference in Chicago. In fact, NASA Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate (there’s a mouthful) and former astronaut John Grunsfeld suggested that ET civilizations might already have detected us, the same way we’re locating and confirming the existence of deep-space planets. Quote:

“We put atmospheric signatures that guarantee someone with a large telescope 20 light years away could detect us. If there is life out there, intelligent life, they’ll know we’re here.”

Left unsaid, what none in that sheltered crowd wants to contemplate: And if they discover us before we discover them, maybe they’re already a lot closer than we think. But of course, there was no room in Chicago for a discussion of UFOs. That would be a little too declasse, like farting in church. Oh, and just to make sure nobody got terribly excited, coverage of last week’s Windy City pow-wow also included a canned statement from NASA chief scientist Ellen Stefan. In April, during a discussion about Mars, she drew distinctions between the discovery of biological life and some other silly alternative like, well, the 2011 peer-reviewed paper’s “targeted asteroid mining” scenario. “We are not talking about little green men,” she insisted. “We are talking about little microbes.”

Stofan could’ve said “intelligent life.” But she went for the gag line instead. Knowing full well how much everybody loves microbes.

Hey, no one wants to look like an idiot as we approach the biggest discovery of all time, wherever that may be. The solution to the Ceres lights will likely fall far short of little green men. But the language we employ as we draw closer to the inevitability doesn’t inspire much confidence; it suggests we’re deeply conflicted in our enthusiasm for confirming The Other. Or at least the people at the top of NASA appear to be. Fortunately, we can console ourselves with the knowledge that science and politics never mix.

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Billy Cox Bids Ufology Adieu … Again

Bill Cox & The Great Taboo

Ever feel like you’re going crazy?

     For whatever reason, my farewell-to-De Void post from 9/13/16 has vanished. It was titled “A shift in the weather.” Don’t know exactly when or why it was removed … but if only the bewilderment ended there. When I went noodling through some of the earliest blogs that still hadn’t auto-purged, from 2009, it was like getting punted into some parallel universe. The comment threads had been erased and replaced with exchanges in Cyrillic. Seriously, I’m not making this up. There were, ostensibly, Russians having conversations by piggy-backing off my blog. This sounds totally insane, but this actually happened. And why me? My biggest regret

By Billy Cox
De Void / Herald Tribune.com
7-14-17

is I didn’t do a screen grab, because when I revisited the same posts the next day, all reader comments – Cyrillic, English, whatever – had been removed. A clean wipe.

Anyway, I’m reposting a version of that mysteriously spiked September blog because I’m still a little pissed. So don’t be erasing my history, whoever you are, or I’ll rewrite it with even less accuracy.

Due to professional circumstances beyond my control, I have been reassigned to a new job here at the Herald-Tribune, a beat which involves a steep learning curve and my undivided attention. As you know, newspapers are undergoing a radical downsizing transition, and no one is immune to these pressures. So at least for now, and for the foreseeable future, I will step away from De Void, which I started writing in April 2007.

By serving up a combination of reporting, analysis, industry criticism and a few other quirks in between, I had hoped I might be able to make a difference in the way my colleagues in traditional media cover UFOs. And in fact, the last nine years have provided some remarkable opportunities for the MSM to rethink its strategy in the way it approaches The Great Taboo. But that was the flaw – assuming there might actually be a strategy in play. Beyond resorting to requisite clichés (e.g., “This next story is out of this world” and “Is the truth really out there?”), chasing balloons (“Mystery shiny objects floating over Manhattan, spark UFO frenzy” – NY Daily News), and hyping common lens flares for ratings (“UFO or Lens Flare in Google Street View? You Decide” – ABC’s “Good Morning America”), big media falls apart when approaching the gorilla in the room. Even CNN’s Anderson Cooper, maybe the most qualified interviewer on corporate television – even his brains roll around in suntan oil and head for the beach whenever he gets near UFOs. And that’s what’s making the blown opportunity of 2016 so dispiriting.

Contrast where we are today with the 2007 Democratic primary debates. That’s when NBC’s Tim Russert asked longshot pacifist Dennis Kucinich to confirm a report that he was eyewitness to a UFO event. Russert, of course, had no interest in the material, and simply wanted to muscle the fading Ohio congressman off the stage and back to the fringe where he belonged. Remember that? Looking like he didn’t know whether to wet his pants or vomit, Kucinich fell back into the shopworn stance of trying to joke it off. And it didn’t help him a lick. Now fast-forward to 2016 and a scenario that would’ve been unthinkable nine years ago – a presidential frontrunner has not only publicly and repeatedly discussed her curiosity about UFOs, she has even advocated releasing related government documents.

Put aside, as if that’s possible, your emotions, pro or con, about Hillary Clinton. Because this is not about her. Nor is it about veteran Beltway operator John Podesta, whose gamble to encourage the former First Lady to speak rationally and fearlessly about The Great Taboo has provoked negligible media blowback. Think about that for a moment. Whenever a public figure in this country utters something stupid or outrageous, the peanut-gallery microphones are always there to rain torrents of snark and reality-based facts and figures on the offender (not that facts make much difference in this day and age). And yet, although the echo chamber has dutifully regurgitated the quotes Clinton has made on three separate occasions about reassessing UFOs, no significant major news platform has bothered to follow up or ask what the hell she means by that. No debate moderator has raised the subject. Not even Clinton’s myriad foes have chosen to weaponize or even make an issue of her remarks concerning undoubtedly the most unconventional topic ever raised on a campaign trail. They’d rather talk about pneumonia.

Folks, this is flat-out freaky. And it begs the question of just how far watchdog journalism has strayed from the public interest. Even badly worded polls show nearly half of Americans believe UFOs are all about ET activity in our own atmosphere. Into this vacuum of empty space comes Hollywood, advertisers, cable television, tabloids, etc., all of whom are far more astute about engaging sustainable numbers than the press. The entertainment industry has also enabled conspiracy paranoia, stoked delusional hopes and unreasonable fears, and made loads of cash off a growth market that shows no signs of dissipating. And for reasons likely best summarized in a groundbreaking 2008 essay appearing in the journal Political Theory, America’s most influential institutions have proven incapable of leading us out of the woods. They remain stubbornly, willfully, perhaps even aggressively, uninformed.

For more than nine years, De Void attempted to bridge that gap, at least on the journalism frontier. With the discoveries of extrasolar Earth-like planets becoming so common they rarely make headlines anymore, with millions of research dollars being dumped into radioscope dishes trolling for alien signals, and given innovations in portable technology designed to track anomalies in our skies, there would appear to be no better moment for the media to snatch the permission slips extended by Clinton/Podesta this year and start asking truly skeptical questions. But that hasn’t happened. Maybe it can’t. Denial and avoidance are the results of faltering attention spans, national and global. We don’t read anymore. We want shortcuts. We think in bumper stickers. Glossy campaign pamphlets are called literature. We want our Cliff Notes rationed in 30-second video bites. We want our favorite colors back, black and white.

Despite the gloom, however, De Void has actually been a lot of gun. It’s forced me to become more discerning and (hopefully) a more careful thinker. It’s given me a deeper appreciation for those who’ve chosen the thankless tasks of attempting to rescue history buried in forgotten archives, for those who pressure bureaucracies for radar records, and the researchers giving voice to veterans whose stories have been disregarded, mocked or repressed for half a century or more.

Most of all, in this era of anonymity and internet cowardice, I have appreciated the civil, thoughtful and provocative tones that often characterize these comment threads. We don’t always agree – in fact, we may rarely agree – but I appreciate the level of sophistication you guys have been bringing to the table. And who knows, we may, in fact, have future discussions here on De Void. If, for instance, Stephen Hawking’s projected ET conquistadors do something as callous and disrespectful as zapping the Kremlin or the newly refurbished Capitol Dome, I’ll probably make time to weigh in as soon as I get through cheering.

And I’ll remain keenly interested in whatever comes next.

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Roswell Witness Described ‘Morphing Memory Metal’; A Tribute to Earl Fulford (Redux)

Roswell Witness Described 'Morphing Memory Metal'; A Tribute to Earl Fulford (Redux)

Free at last

     What’s it like to talk freely about a state secret you’ve been forced to live with for 60 years?

“Earl felt like he was out of prison,” recalls Mary Fulford. “He felt like he’d been held for years in a vacuum and finally was released. It was great. The last two years of his life, he was in his glory because he was able to speak up.”

Earl Fulford was one of many who went public two years ago, in a book called “Witness to Roswell” by Don Schmitt and Thomas Carey.

Billy Cox

By Billy Cox
De Void
2-16-09

He was stationed at Roswell Army Air Field in 1947 when he was ordered into the so-called UFO debris field for cleanup detail. Joined by more than a dozen other grunts, and under the hawk-eyed command of MPs, Fulford described gathering more than a dozen foil-like strips of memory metal, which morphed into their original, wrinkle-free shapes after he crumpled them in his fist.

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“35th Fighter Squadron . . . Routinely Tracked UFOs On Radar” (Redux)

      The official biography of the late Lt. Gen. Laurence C. Craigie on the Air Force Web site describes him as the first American military pilot to fly a jet, and that he ended his distinguished career as commander of Allied Air Forces in Southern Europe in the 1950s.

But there’s no mention of what he did in December 1947 – issued an order establishing the first Air Force study of UFOs.


By Billy Cox
De Void
5-29-07
Editor’s Note: As a tribute to investigative journalist, Billy Cox, we will from time to time republish some of his earlier articles–FW

Craigie was USAF director of research and development when he authorized Project Sign, which ended in 1948, not long after Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Hoyt Vandenberg reportedly rejected analysts’ suggestions that the phenomena had extraterrestrial origins.

In January, 82-year-old Ellenton resident Ben Games told a UFO Group of Manatee audience that for a six-month period in 1947, he was Craigie’s personal pilot. And that in the summer of that year, Craigie had been dispatched by then-Deputy Chief of Air Staff for Research and Development Gen. Curtis LeMay to Roswell, N.M., to investigate what was being reported in the media as the crash of a flying saucer.

Although Games said the tight-lipped Craigie volunteered nothing to him about what he’d learned during his overnight stay in Roswell, and that Craigie met with President Harry Truman immediately afterwards, the military never deceived the public about what happened.

“There was never any conspiracy to cover anything up,” Games told listeners. “But conspiracies sell newspapers, and that’s all anybody talks about.”

Games, who has 22 DD-214 discharge papers to show for his eclectic, 44-year military career, also possesses personal flight logs dating back to 1942.

But records from early July 1947, when he says he ferried Craigie from Bolling Field in Washington, D.C., to New Mexico, are missing. He can’t explain that.

However, Games says he “wouldn’t be surprised” if something weird had crashed near Roswell; after all, he says the 35th Fighter Squadron he was assigned to in occupied Japan routinely tracked UFOs on radar at 60,000 feet during 1945-46.

They pulled 90-degree turns at gut-splashing speeds of 1,000 mph at a time when state-of-the-art American warplanes struggled to reach 40,000 feet. Pilots even scrambled stripped-down P-51s and P-61s to get a visual lock on the bogies — to no avail.

“But there was no secrecy about any of this stuff, nobody ever told me to shut up about it,” Games says. “So I wish people would just get off this conspiracy kick.”

OK.

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Ufology: Corporate Media Blew Its Most Promising Opportunity

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The media disgrace

Ufology: Corporate Media Blew Its Most Promising Opportunity
“…corporate media blew its most promising opportunity — ever — for instigating a policy-level discussion of The Great Taboo…”

     Two tantalizing developments in late October, just days shy of the most demoralizing U.S. presidential campaign in the history of the world:

1) Using NASA data, a journal called Proceedings of the National Academy of Science announced it had calculated that more than 8.8 billion Earth-like planets inhabit the Milky Way galaxy alone. Which is depressing enough. But also: 2) Another journal, Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, identified 234 stars amid a survey of 2.5 million in which light-pulse signatures were consistent with theoretical models


By Billy Cox
De Void
11-10-16

predicting extraterrestrial intelligence. The second item is far more speculative and controversial than the first, but the confirmation of either would turn our conceits upside down. Or at least we wouldn’t have to resign ourselves to the idea that the way we do things in this joint is as good as it’s ever going to get.

Nope, unfortunately, UFOs haven’t destroyed Capitol Hill or the Kremlin, and De Void is not back. But after seeing how corporate media blew its most promising opportunity — ever — for instigating a policy-level discussion of The Great Taboo, it’s difficult to sit back and pretend we’re not in very deep trouble, and on such a fundamental level. Market-tested and auto-programmed for parroting trivia, fear and anger, the Fourth Estate appears to have also severed its links to those things that can evoke the best of who we are or hope to be.

I used to follow crowds of visitors onto the banks of the Indian River Lagoon and the beaches of Cape Canaveral, where they converged for the countdown to shuttle launches and planetary missions, most of which rarely made their deadlines. But no matter. Taking expensive chances with the weather and the inevitable hardware glitches, they rolled in from everywhere, from around the world, pickup trucks, RVs, lawn chairs, binoculars, bug spray, SPF50, coolers, Coleman grills, lanterns, campfires, tripods, radios, you name it, they packed it. And it wasn’t just to watch — they could’ve tuned into network coverage for that, and with a lot less aggravation. They came to participate, to be a part of something that reduced to irrelevance whatever affiliations that divided them, even if they weren’t aware of it. And they were united by storylines that generated parades of firsts:

First woman astronaut, first black astronaut, first teacher, first Saudi, first Israeli, first American in orbit giving it another shot to see if his 77-year-old bones could withstand, 35 years later, the rigors of space flight. There were multi-ethnic multi-racial shuttle crews fulfilling Gene Rodenberry’s “Star Trek” prophecy. There were astronauts pushing back against skittish administrators, demanding a chance to risk their lives to fix a failing telescope renowned for peering into the edge of time. There was the 96-year-old widow of the astronomer who discovered Pluto, on hand to watch an unmanned craft programmed to deliver, among other things, her husband’s ashes to that unimaginably distant world.

These stories fueled pilgrimages. And the entire planet joined the learning curve, sometimes in horror, learning to exhale only after solid-rocket boosters cleared the fuel tank 90 seconds out. On the high frontier, death is the ultimate price of knowledge; yet, the waiting list to engage that voyage swells. And it has been this way since the first crazy people hopped into hollowed-out logs and splashed off for nothing more than invisible hunches and theories on treasures their faith said lay waiting beyond the horizon.

Walter Cronkite once said history will look back on America’s Apollo moon program as the 20th century’s crowning achievement; indeed, 50 years later, the study of the neurological shading that occurs when space travelers gaze upon Earth — called the “Overview Effect” — is only beginning. But Cronkite’s sensibilities were nowhere in evidence during the presidential debates. There were 27 national stage-managed auditions during the campaign of 2015-16, and unless I missed something, not a single journalist bothered to solicit a candidate’s vision for space, the arena in which the U.S. and Russia are indispensable partners. Not a one. In fact, after securing their party’s nominations, neither Trump nor Clinton could find room for a website blurb on NASA policy. But you can bet your ass those two would’ve dashed off something, no matter how cynical or meaningless, had a single member of the press stepped up to ask about it in a public forum.

Which brings us to journalism’s great lost moment. Let’s do this again:

For the first time ever, a monopoly-party candidate attempted to post UFOs on the Beltway talkboard. With persistent nudges from campaign director John Podesta, Hillary Clinton on three separate occasions showcased not only a conversational grasp of the phenomenon but also a rhetorical willingness to pursue the issue wherever it led. All three statements rated dutiful cut ‘n’ paste coverage worldwide. But not a single major daily or network or public radio station had the guts, or the foundational knowledge, to ask HRC why — exactly — she was so interested in broaching such a politically radioactive topic. It made no sense, tactically or strategically. It was a baffling non sequitur, with no moneyed momentum to propel it. Where were the payoffs? Who was the audience? It was intended to be a counterweight to — what?

Well, given how no news division or editorial board saw fit to mention our once-bejeweled space program, their failure to confront Clinton with her counterintuitive UFO remarks was at least consistent. And as a final kick out the door, Esquire magazine’s snark over the Podesta/Clinton gamble, published two weeks ago, mirrored the prevailing media tone over the last 11 months: “Cracking the Crackpot Vote — How do you win over true believers (in extraterrestrials) in an election this crazy?” If you were too stupid to get it, the editors punched it up with an illustration of HRC sitting on a flying saucer shooting a laser beam from its belly.

Someday, these presentations will be compared with what “Reefer Madness” did for marijuana laws. For now, what is truly unforgivable is journalism’s demonstrated inability to revitalize rigorous inquiry into whatever may be waiting for us out there, conventional angles or otherwise. Even as the universe grows more crowded, more vivid and more complex with each flip of the calendar.

Like an amoeba, our species assumes its definition not at its middle, but at its leading edges, at the margins, where it decides to go next. If we’re losing our capacity for awe — not to mention an appreciation for the human ingenuity required for translation — let’s start calling out the usual media suspects. Clinton-Trump ’16 flagged an opportunity for institutional journalism to explore documentation it has never properly addressed, to make a different kind of history, no matter who won. And like a streak of summer lightning, that moment flickered and vanished. It’s already almost like it never existed.

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The Latest Update on the Woes of Alleged Alien Abductee Stan Romanek

The Latest Update on the Woes of Alleged Alien Abductee Stan Romanek

Another crash ‘n’ burn

     Not that we need additional examples of journalism’s failure to apply minimum standards to UFO coverage, but the latest update on the woes of alleged alien abductee Stan Romanek is an especially bitter pill, considering how much mileage this guy clocked at the expense of a far more important story.

De Void rarely ventures into the abduction realm because of its inherent subjectivity. Some accounts can be interesting, perhaps even valuable, but the bottom line is, there are no substitutes for multiple simultaneous eyewitness reports fortified with radar tracks. Which is


By Billy Cox
De Void
8-10-16

what MUFON’s well-documented report on the Stephenville UFO incident delivered in the summer of 2008. Not to mention how its FOIA requests forced the military to retract its original spin on related events.

MUFON released its Stephenville analysis – complete with the UFO’s dead-on approach toward the no-fly zone around President Bush’s “western White House” in Crawford, Tex., on Jan. 8, 2008– to little fanfare on July 11 of that year. Considering how F-16s had forced down accidental private-pilot intrusions on at least three separate earlier occasions during Bush’s presidency, and also considering how the bogey had no transponder, and that radar pingbacks showed there were no jet fighters anywhere to challenge the target as it bore down on restricted air space, one might think this constituted what we in the news business like to call news. Instead, Romanek’s abduction scenario had sucked all the oxygen out of the room by time the report came out. Why? Well, Romanek supposedly had footage of a space alien.

Pictures are to the media gaggle what Twizzlers are to ants. And that’s what Romanek’s confidante, Denver resident Jeff Peckman, dangled before the press on May 30, 2008 – a single teaser frame lifted off an extended sequence purporting to show a lightbulb-headed space alien doing a peeping-Tom number on Romanek’s bedroom window. Although the footage would eventually go public, the rest was withheld at the time on account of documentary contract negotiations. But it didn’t matter. That single rather cheesy image was enough to swivel all the right heads and, a week or so later, it catapulted Peckman onto David Letterman’s national stage, where he went on to claim Uncle Sam has confirmed 57 species of space aliens have visited Earth. Peckman would continue to draw media attention by lobbying the city council to form an E.T. welcoming committee.

Meanwhile, a few weeks later, back in the Denver suburb of Littleton, MUFON/Stephenville report co-author and radar expert Glen Schulze couldn’t get the press to give him the time of day. “Neither the Denver Post nor the Rocky Mountain News has shown any curiosity about this (Stephenville) story,” Schulze complained at the time, “and I’m in their backyard. There was one article about a guy who wants to form an E.T. welcoming committee …”

This happened so long ago, the Rocky Mountain News has been dead for seven years. The reason “we” choose to rehash this incident is that Denver media is now reporting how “UFO conspiracy theorist Stan Romanek” will soon stand trial on child-porn charges. Although the alien video – also called the “boo tape” – and his claims surrounding it have fallen apart, Romanek has been charging government harassment ever since. On Sunday, Romanek-watcher Jack Brewer issued a blistering takedown of the accused’s sometimes freakish efforts to defend the boo tape, which is well worth reading. And because Romanek was once celebrated in certain circles as The Man With The Proof, Brewer poses a challenge of his own:

“Should the UFO community not suffer the public relations consequences of celebrating what to more moderate members of society clearly appear to be disturbed individuals? If not the ufology event organizers and consumers, who, exactly, is responsible for putting people at podiums who fail to demonstrate abilities to follow and present rational lines of reasoning?

“… No matter how the Romanek trial unfolds, the social issues will be on full display, and their relevance will remain regardless of the verdict. It will be completely apparent … that the UFO community, in its current incarnation, offers acceptance and normalcy to people intent on avoiding accountability for their statements and actions while averting from critical thinking.”

Whether you agree or not, this much is true: those damning Stephenville radar records – the data that so clearly embarrassed the USAF eight years ago – have been relegated to the fringe while the man who enthralled large audiences with an endlessly tangled web is news. Again. So if we’re going to point fingers, let’s not let the media off the hook, either.

Visit Billy’s Site ►

See Also:

UPDATE: Attorneys Postpone Romanek Trial

Ufology Indicted

STAN ROMANEK UPDATE: Trial Date Set in Child Porn Case

UPDATE: Stan Romanek Back in Court for Preliminary Hearing

UPDATE: Stan Romanek Declared Competent To Stand Trial

STAN ROMANEK UPDATE: Self-Described Alien Abductee & Accused Child Porn Distributor Appears in Court Today (12-1-14) for [Mental] Competency Hearing

STAN ROMANEK UPDATE: Second [Mental] Competency Evaluation Requested By Defense

Stan Romanek, Self-Described Alien Abductee & Accused Child Porn Distributor Goes Back To Court This Wednesday (8-6-14)

STAN ROMANEK UPDATE: Evidence in Alleged Attack on Accused Child Porn Distributor & Self-Described Alien Abductee Inconsistent with Claim, Case Suspended

UPDATE: Self-Described Alien Abductee & Accused Child Porn Distributor, Stan Romanek’s Mental Competency To Be Determined

Continue Reading . . .

Self-Proclaimed ‘Alien Abductee,’ Stan Romanek Arrested for Child Porn

STAN ROMANEK UPDATE: Police Reports Reveal Heinous Allegations in Child Porn Case Against Self-Described Alien Abductee

UPDATE: Self-Described Alien Abductee, Stan Romanek Appears in Court on Child Pornography Charges

Man Claims Aliens Send Him Messages

Space Alien Video Lands in Denver: Was it Real or Fake?

Lost in Space

The Stan Romanek Saga

“Jeff Peckman May be Spaced Out, but Alien Expert Stan Romanek is The Real Little Green Man”

Man Claims Aliens Send Him Messages

Stan Romanek:
Point – Counterpoint With James Carrion Vs Rick Nelson

Stan Romanek Threatens Lawsuit

Are You ‘Fallowing’ Me?

Digging Away

REPORT YOUR UFO EXPERIENCE

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Clinton Aide Still Mum on UFOs

Webb Hubbell

     Last month, Canadian researcher Grant Cameron, arguably the leading authority on the Clinton administration’s dalliance with UFOs in the Nineties, condensed his research into an ebook called The Clinton UFO Storybook: ET Politics in The White House. It’s gotten a little buzz here and there, The Washington Times, Coast to Coast AM, nothing major, despite the fact that big-media outfits like The New York Times and The Washington Post weren’t shy about rehashing the two-decade old story earlier this year.

“In the end nothing much changed,” states Cameron in an email to De


By Billy Cox
De Void
7-28-16

Void, reflecting on the tepid critical feedback. “People are still busy chasing stories about the latest light in the sky. I thought it might take off but not too surprised it didn’t.”

As Hillary Clinton prepares to accept the Democratic nomination for POTUS tonight, however, Cameron looks back on his long investigation – an investigation that ultimately provided the backdrop for informed queries into HRC’s curiosity about UFOs – with at least a measure of satisfaction. “The biggest thrill of the whole thing was the incident that got me to do the book,” he notes. “That was the statement that Hillary made to (New Hampshire newspaper reporter Draymond) Steer in 2007 telling him that the most requested FOIA item at the Clinton Library was UFOs. At that point I had actually given all my Clinton documents away thinking that waiting for a break from the White House was a big waste of time. When she referenced my FOIAs I thought, ‘Wow they are actually paying attention.’”

Anyhow, given the imminent history-making occasion in Philadelphia, De Void can’t help but flash back to a weird and futile email exchange, beginning in 2012, with the man President Clinton dispatched to prowl around for UFO records 20 years ago. Like some Kung Fu zenmaster, former associate Attorney General Webb Hubbell resisted De Void’s email quest for details with an enigmatic reply: “The answers to all your questions will be revealed.” (???) He batted back all subsequent questions with indifference.

Well, a few weeks ago, looking to promote his latest murder-mystery thriller, Hubbell discharged yet another email blast to media outlets. And with all the enthusiasm of his Confederate ancestors’ assault on Cemetery Ridge, De Void decided to make one more last-gasp pass at the sphinx.

To Webb Hubbell, 7/28/16, 10:29 a.m.: OK, just for the sake of due diligence, I’ll be happy to promote your book if you’ll tell me about your attempts to learn more about UFOs under the Clinton administration. Thanks (again) for your consideration. Regards, bcox

To Billy Cox, 7/28/16, 10:52 a.m.: When Hillary is elected she says she will reveal all I discovered. Your answers are near. W.

To Webb Hubbell, 7/28/16, 11:01 a.m.: I’m not entirely certain she actually said that. Is this something you know for a fact, or just something you believe to be true?

To Billy Cox, 7/28/2016, 11:07 a.m.: Only what I have read. W.

To Webb Hubbell, 7/28/16, 11:11 a.m.: No desire to go on record to see if it will square with what she ultimately delivers? It would make a great yardstick.

To Billy Cox, 7/28/16, 11:13 a.m.: They have the right to decide first. I’ll decide what to do after the election. W.

To Webb Hubbell, 7/28/16, 11:15 a.m.: Well, OK, appreciate the feedback. Keep me in mind when/if you decide to go into detail. Thanks.

To Billy Cox, 7/28/16, 11:19 a.m.: Will do. W.

And the check’s in the mail, the only TV I watch is PBS, I can get another 20 miles on empty, we’ll get right on it, he’s never bitten anyone before, it’s supposed to make that noise, we can still be good friends, etc. etc.

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UFODATA … To Develop and Deploy Portable UFO Detection Technologies

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Can open science and secrecy coexist?

     A six-year wait to get an Air Force document released through Freedom of Information Act channels? For a letter written in 1950? Really?

That was longtime investigator Keith Chester’s experience a few weeks ago, when government censors finally cleared a correspondence from an officer with the USAF’s Directorate of Intelligence to the CIA. And it wasn’t like the Air Force was asking for instructions on how to dispose of corpses; it just wanted the Agency to see if it could obtain 70 feet of UFO footage taken by a TV crew


By Billy Cox
De Void
5-22-16

in Louisville, Ky. Sixty-six years later, the request for assistance – not the actual images in question – finally gets declassified.

Data points like these matter because, thanks to the nudge from Hillary Clinton and campaign director John Podesta, the mainstream media is swinging its collective, and so-far superficial, attention to the political ramifications of The Great Taboo for the first time this century. And one of the most unexpected emerging voices to express authentic curiosity about UFOs is former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Chris Mellon.

Two weeks ago, in an interview with author Leslie Kean, and again in The New York Times, a man who also spent more than a decade assessing national security issues for the Senate Intelligence Committee urged readers to seriously re-evaluate an issue long relegated to ridicule and tabloid skank. This wasn’t just a pose. In 2015, Mellon quietly joined the board of UFODATA, a nonprofit working to develop and deploy portable UFO detection technologies through crowdfunding.

But in calling for a clean-slate approach to the mystery – i.e., let’s forge ahead with new science instead of falling back on counterproductive accusations – Mellon has invited considerable skepticism from some researchers who’ve made underground careers using FOIA to dislodge relevant government paper. “In my view,” asserted Mellon, who finds it difficult to believe that UFO secrets could be held under wraps for so many decades, “calling for the end to an alleged government UFO cover-up is almost certainly a dead end, and does not help inspire anyone in government to become more open to the topic.”

That’s probably true. Which agency, organization or foundation wants to launch a good-faith investigation from a defensive posture? But given websites like Project 1947, which showcases layers of the puzzle still being peeled off the onion of World War II, or at the exhaustively detailed Minot AFB UFO and www.ufohastings.com, where scores of military veterans have stepped up to share first-hand accounts of an orchestrated information clampdown, researchers are unmoved by Mellon’s statements about “never detect(ing) the faintest hint of government interest or involvement in UFOs” during his “comprehensive review of DoD’s black programs.”

Brad Sparks, for instance, argues super-secret special access programs (SAP), frequently theorized to be the repositories of government UFO projects – and of which Mellon’s committee had oversight – aren’t the only places to look. “Why limit things to SAPs?” he wonders in an email. “There are ACCMs (Alternative Compensatory Control Measures) that imitate SAPs but are even less accountable, less controlled, and less traceable. There are SCI [Sensitive Compartmented Information] Codeword Compartments where there is no organization, no project, just the existing intelligence agency org acting on and analyzing data within the SCI Codeword Compartments marked on documents.

“… There are SCI Codeword Compartments that eventually become special projects or SAPs. When Ike created the TALENT-KEYHOLE Control System on Feb. 7, 1958, for recon satellites there was no special project or SAP for it, only the existing CIA and AF orgs. TK was just like a classification marking (TOP SECRET/TALENT-KEYHOLE or TS/TK) but with a whole security system, security agents, manuals, indoctrination, etc. Only in 1960 did the AF create a special project office, in effect a SAP, under that SCI Codeword (TK or TK-CS Control System), which became the nucleus of the NRO in 1961-2.”

Confused? Just wait. Mellon’s contention that, if elected, Clinton “should officially task NORAD with collection and analysis responsibility” provoked an exasperated response from Paul Dean. Firing off FOIAs for years, the tenacious Aussie notes how North American Aerospace Command – a bilateral resource-sharing agreement between Canada and the U.S. – receives its space surveillance data from America’s Strategic Command. In a recent recent blogpost, Dean serves up STRATCOM definitions from a 2004 directive which refers to anomalies as Uncorrelated Targets (UCT). STRATCOM divides these mysteries into four categories: Nonsignificant, Significant, Critical, or False.

The UCT section states the Critical designation applies to “any UCT which is suspected to be related to a new foreign launch.” To qualify for the Critical label, a UCT is required to meet at least one of four criteria. But all four of those criteria are redacted from a document whose original status was classified “Secret.” The origins of UCT terminology go back for decades, and in efforts to get a coherent handle on the intelligence infrastructure monitoring the high frontier, Dean says he and his FOIA collaborators have met institutional resistance every step of the way.

“Everyone thinks about questions of ‘UFO coverup,’” he states in an email, “but they also imagine that the evidence … can be easily served up on a silver platter, like one PDF or one youtube video or whatever. The reality is that it has become backbreaking work. All day I’m disentangling obfuscated, out-of-order, incomplete documentation, filing FOIAs or MDRs, [mandatory declassification review] battling with bureaucracies for every scrap of paper … Nothing can be slapped together willy-nilly.”

Which begs the question: If support builds for the sort of open and legitimate scientific inquiry urged by Chris Mellon, would the success of such a project be contingent upon removing the historical context of secrecy from the discussion? Certainly the UFO transparency campaign proffered by Podesta/Clinton implies secrecy as an obstacle to clarity. Is an honest above-board study possible without trespassing into national security turf? Are we smart enough to strike a balance? And what, exactly, would it take to inspire public confidence in the integrity of such a study?

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UFO Psychodrama with President Clinton’s Former Associate, Attorney General Webster “Webb” Hubbell

Webb Hubbell

A Webb of confusion

     De Void’s UFO psychodrama with President Clinton’s former associate Attorney General Webster “Webb” Hubbell briefly defied rigor mortis last week in yet another round of pointless emails. For latecomers to this adventure of the mind, here’s the cheat sheet first:

Arkansas Supreme Court Chief Justice, Little Rock mayor, and Rose Law Firm partner with Hillary Clinton in the 1970s, Hubbell joined the Clinton Justice Department in 1993. The erstwhile Razorback offensive tackle resigned in 1994 during a tax fraud investigation, which produced an indictment and a conviction. After pulling time in the clanger, Hubbell in his 1997 autobiography Friends In High Places dropped a weird little teaser about how No. 42 assigned him to gather previously undisclosed information about UFOs and the JFK assassination. Webb wrote he didn’t have any luck, and he let it go at that. But his claims begged for elucidation.


By Billy Cox
De Void
2-26-16

In 2012, with a former CIA agent stating he discovered a smoking-gun cache of Roswell evidence in the Agency’s archives in 1995, De Void contacted Hubbell for a response. What followed was a protracted and bizarre exchange that – fshhzzt! – simply fizzled out like a little party balloon. Still, De Void continued to receive Webb’s email blasts because he’s writing books now, nonfiction this time, thrillers evidently. Earlier this month, I got another one touting the upcoming release of quote “the next Jack Patterson Thriller, A Game of Inches, which comes out in May.”

So what the hell, right?

To Webb Hubbell, 2/17/16, 4:18 p.m.: How about a comment or two on the Hillary/Podesta advocacy for transparency on UFOs?

Two minutes later …

To Billy Cox, 2/17/16, 4:20 p.m.: That’s a good idea. W

WTF?

To Webb Hubbell, 2/17/16, 4:21 p.m.: Seriously, it could help promote your book.

To Billy Cox, 2/17/16, 5:19 p.m.: I’m serious. good idea. W

OK dude. Don’t blow it. Don’t come off all lovesick and craven. Let him sleep on it.

To Webb Hubbell, 2/18/16, 9:13 a.m. Great. Should we do a phoner, or would you prefer a list of email questions?

No reply. But it’s Thursday. Give him the weekend to climb into the attic and lug down all those boxloads of notes.

The weekend comes and goes. Monday comes and goes. Now it’s Tuesday.

To Webb Hubbell, 2/23/16, 10:00 a.m.: Cold feet? I get that. Still – it’s time this country had the long overdue adult conversation. I hope you’ll be a part of it.

To Billy Cox, 2/23/16, 10:13 a.m.: Don’t have cold feet. Its not March yet. W.

Hunh? Doesn’t the weather start to warm up in March? Maybe he’s in the Southern Hemisphere. Either way, screw it, the bobber’s still twitching.

To Webb Hubbell, 2/23/16, 1:26 p.m.: OK, here goes: Was there any context for your assignment to look for UFO records? In other words, were you aware of any longstanding interest by the Clintons in the phenomenon before they got to the White House? Did you ask why President was interested in this subject?

Do you remember exactly when President Clinton initially contacted you about researching UFOs/JFK? Was the assignment a surprise to you, or had you sort of been expecting it? Personally, I might’ve thought someone with military or intelligence credentials would be better positioned to dig for this stuff.

Did you ask for an intelligence briefing on the subject? If so, who did that for you and what were you told? How much time did you devote to your research? Was it just you or did you have staffers helping out? With what agencies or individuals did you consult? Did you check in with John Gibbons at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy? How much did you know about Laurance Rockefeller’s lobbying efforts to bring transparency to this issue? Any interaction with John Podesta on UFOs during this period? When you stated you didn’t find anything, was it because there was nothing there, or was it because you ran into a wall of classification? Were you satisfied with the access you got? When and why did you conclude your search? And how surprised are you today that Podesta and Hillary aren’t afraid to talk about an issue that most politicians wouldn’t touch without strapping themselves into hazmat suits?

Evidently the Clinton library has released more than 7,000 pages of files on the JFK assassination. Were you surprised by anything you discovered on that end?

Again, I’ll be happy to mention your book.

No reply. He’s probably deliriously ecstatic about having his literary endeavors promoted in De Void. I’ll give him a night to steady his nerves. He’ll probably have something waiting for me in my inbox first thing in the morning.

To Webb Hubbell, 2/24/16, 3:05 p.m.: OK, just for the sake of clarity, you were just pulling my chain, right?

The day goes by. Then another day. And another. This is soooo not the way to get De Void to rave about the next Jack Patterson Thriller.

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Astronaut Edgar Mitchell and Immunity For UFO Insiders

 Astronaut Edgar Mitchell and Immunity For UFO Insiders

The way of the explorer

     I first met moonwalker Edgar Mitchell in late 1995, at a restaurant in the back yard of Kennedy Space Center, which was getting ready to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Apollo 14. Given how NASA types tended to treat UFO questions like warlocks and unicorns, De Void was unprepared for Mitchell’s receptivity. No, he insisted, he hadn’t seen evidence of UFOs during his off-planet adventures. “NASA at that time was so sure there were no such things, there was no discussion of it.” But he added this: “I would say, however, that if there was knowledge of ET contact existing within the government, and we were sent into space blind and dumb to such information, I think it is a case of criminal culpability.”
By Billy Cox
De Void
2-9-16

Criminal culpability. Whoa. Thus began a long conversation with one of the old astronaut corps’ unique thinkers. This was a guy who, after admitting he conducted ESP experiments on the moon in 1971, took a lot of crap from colleagues – and he didn’t care. He went onto formalize his curiosity about human consciousness by founding the Institute of Noetic Sciences, which went on to publish papers on everything from meditation to the “Physical effects of collective attention at Burning Man 2013.”

Anyhow, the former Navy captain rolled his own tobacco that night, back when you could still smoke indoors, and he talked about one of his even more unusual intrigues. A year or so earlier, during Air Force efforts to resolve General Accounting Office questions about missing records related to the 1947 Roswell controversy, USAF Secretary Sheila Widnall had granted amnesty to potential whistleblowers who might produce leads, but by that time the major players were dead. One year after that, without naming names, Mitchell said he was in discussions with former military or government operatives who wanted to extend immunity to cover even more UFO insiders.

“The purpose of the meeting was not to convince anybody else of their stories,” he said, “but to get people released from their security oaths with regard to these phenomena. Given who they were, and their credentials, I have to tell you, it pushed my confidence level up five notches.” Mitchell said he was shaken by what he was learning. “I am convinced there is a small body of valid (UFO) information, and that there is a body of information ten times as big that is total disinformation put out by the sources to confuse the whole issue.” He described the setup as “a body of semi- or quasi-private organization” operating with black-budget federal funding. “And nobody knows what goes into black budgets. The prime requisite is security first and everything else second.”

Without more details, Mitchell’s allegations sounded like something Fox Mulder’s scriptwriters could’ve hatched without really trying. We now know that the sixth man on the moon had, in 1995, begun huddling with “Ambassador to the Universe” Disclosure guru Steven Greer, whose ET outreach tuition now begins at $2,500 a pop. The Mitchell-Greer bond fell apart when Greer began using Mitchell’s name as a witness to promote his Disclosure initiative. Mitchell, in fact, had no first-hand knowledge of Greer’s alleged cloak-and-dagger scenario, and he charged Greer with “overreach(ing) his data continuously.”

But in 2008 – and once again, without naming names – Mitchell stoked the embers when he told CNN’s Larry King he had met a high-level Pentagon official pooh-bah who told Mitchell that he – the pooh-bah official – couldn’t get his hands on classified UFO documents because he lacked the proper security clearance. But that was a story Greer had been repeating for years. And that official was Rear Adm. Thomas R. Wilson, former Defense Intelligence Agency director and – at the time of his meeting with Mitchell in 1997 – director of intelligence for the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

So De Void got on the horn to Wilson, whose golden parachute had made for a soft-retirement landing with a defense contractor in Minnesota. Wilson definitely remembered Mitchell asking him about pursuing UFO leads. But Wilson also said he had all the security passes he needed. “What is true is that I met with them,” Wilson told De Void in a phoner. “What is not true is that I was denied access to this material, because I didn’t pursue it. I may have left it open with them, but it was not especially compelling, not compelling enough to waste my staff’s time to go looking for it.”

Mitchell told De Void he was “shocked” by Wilson’s answer. Ever the gentleman, however, Mitchell declined to argue: “I do not wish to engage him on this matter.” For his part, Greer stood by his Wilson story in an email: “I was there and I know what he said. I was also informed prior to the meeting that, after sending him a secret document with UFO-related code names and numbers, that he located one of the compartments but was specifically denied access to the operation.” And that was that.

But so earnestly did Mitchell want to get to the bottom of the mystery that he traveled to Mexico City for the unveiling of what would be the biggest UFO fiasco of 2015 – the Roswell space alien cadaver pix, which were being hyped as a game-changer. Within days, the images were discovered to be Kodak slides of a Native American mummy. De Void didn’t attempt to contact the Apollo veteran for reaction after that. But living in fear of making mistakes would’ve been an untenable prospect for one of only a dozen men to leave bootprints on another world.

“The desire to live life to its fullest, to acquire more knowledge, to abandon the economic treadmill,” he wrote in his autobiography The Way of the Explorer, “are all typical reactions to these experiences in altered states of consciousness. The previous fear of death is typically quelled. If the individual generally remains thereafter in the existential state of awareness, the deep internal feeling of eternity is quite profound and unshakable.” After literally expanding the perimeters of human history, what could possibly be intimidating after that? Name-calling?

So bon voyage, Dr. Mitchell. And here’s hoping that your greatest wish for those who determine our fates will someday come to pass: “From out there on the moon, international politics look so petty. You want to grab a politician by the scruff of the neck and drag him a quarter of a million miles out and say ‘Look at that, you son of a bitch.’”

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